RV SURFING THE WEST COAST

An RV trip is always an adventure, but sometimes you need to turn up the adventure even more. This was one of those times and we decided to travel from the Mexican border all the way up the west coast to the Canadian border, surfing along the way on a mega RV surfing trip!

 

 

I’ve heard and read about people doing this trip before, but almost always it’s in a camper van and they’re roughing it. We did it a little differently, heading up this absolutely breathtaking coast, with all the conveniences of home. There’s no way to express some of the memories that are etched into my mind from this RV trip, truly a once in a lifetime experience.

 

The Start – San Diego

 

 

We left Minnesota in December shortly after Ella was born to sunny San Diego. I couldn’t wait to hit the waves! We were staying at a campsite where there was nothing between us and Mexico other than a mountain. My goal was to start surfing right at the Mexican border in Imperial Beach. When we got there, we found that it had rained and it washed a bunch of sewage and toxic waste from Tijuana into the ocean causing them to shut down the beach…

 

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TYBEE ISLAND

It’s hard to beat the charm of a southern coastal town, especially in late February when the northeast is still buttoned up for winter. When I saw an event posted with the Sisters on the Fly for Tybee Island, Georgia, I jumped on the opportunity. Tybee Island, off the coast of northern Georgia, has long been on my hit list and since February is my “slow season” I figured, “why not?” Right off the bat I decided that I would not pull my trailer down there but instead stay in the campgrounds rental cottages. My trailer was still winterized and with so many campgrounds now offering the cabin rental option I decided it was a good time to experience this growing trend in the industry. We booked our cabin at the only campground on the island, Rivers End Campground and RV Park. The spare but comfortable cabins suggest a maximum occupancy of six but unless you are a very close knit group I would say more like four. There was a nice rear bedroom with a double bed and then a set of bunkbeds in what amounted to the hallway. We didn’t mind, we were there to fish, explore Tybee and historic Savannah and catch up with our sister friends.

 

Sweetie Pies was still closed for the season when we were there but locals say the ice cream served there is worth the wait in line to get it.

 

Tybee is a barrier island on the most northern coastal tip of the state of Georgia. It has one of the most beautiful and most photographed lighthouses in the country. The lighthouse is positioned at the mouth of the Savannah River and when the ninety-foot structure was first constructed in 1736, it was the highest structure in the country. Today it is a historically preserved site that sits on five acres and popular tourist attraction. It is one of just a few 18th century lighthouses still in operation. We arrived to see it only thirty minutes before closing but enjoyed every bit of it. I will definitely allow a half a day for this treasure on my next trip.

 

At one time the Tybee Island Lighthouse was the tallest structure in the US.

 

The island became a refuge for the crowded citizens of Savannah at the end of the 19th century and many of the bungalow beach cottages still exist today. Tybee residents apparently like a good parade and there are several each year including the Mardi Gras parade that the Sisters on the Fly participated in this year. Each year the town hosts a Beach Bum parade the weekend before Memorial Day, where those on the floats and those viewing from the road shoot each other with water guns. I am told it is packed! Mark your calendars for the weekend before Memorial Day if you want to partake!

 

Sisters on the Fly Pat Hoke and Carol Thompson all dressed up for the islands Mardi Gras Parade.

 

After exploring the island’s bungalow buildings and gift shops we headed into Savannah for a tour of the Bonaventure Cemetery. This cemetery was the setting for the book, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, and sits on 160 acres of a bluff overlooking the Wilmington River. Some of its famous residents are singer and song writer Johnny Mercer and poet Conrad Aiken, but what I found fascinating were the tales of Savannah’s ordinary folks who somehow became immortalized in death. A frequently visited grave is that of little six-year-old, Gracie Watson, the daughter of a hotelier in Savannah who succumbed to pneumonia in the days before antibiotics. Her grave has a beautifully carved sculpture of Gracie by the famous headstone maker of the day, John Waltz. The likeness was said to be so spot on that her parents could not bear to look at it and moved back to New England inspiring town folks to care for poor neglected Gracie. To this day pilgrims visit the cemetery leaving tokens for Gracie. Our guide was part historian, and part storyteller who informed and entertained us on a two hour walking tour that I thoroughly enjoyed. You can tour the cemetery on your own but I highly recommend the guided tour.

 

The Bonaventure Cemetery in Savannah had stories to tell. One headstone of a mother said, “she did what she could.” There must be more to that story!

 

Another great guided tour we took in Savannah was on the river boat, the Georgia Queen. The captain took us up and then down the river sharing many points of interest from history as well as modern day. The Savannah River is the fourth largest seaport in the US and it was fascinating to learn the details of how the ships adhere to the tide schedules to get their fare in and out; the role that tug boats play in that operation and what life on the river was like one hundred years ago. We went on the afternoon cruise but there is also a dinner cruise that is highly praised that I will put on my list for next time.

 

 

The Georgia Queen river boat offers two hours tours along the Savannah River with a fascinating narration of the history of this seaport.

 

One of the things I looked forward to the most in anticipating this trip was the opportunity to fish with my friend and fishing mentor Carole. I grew up in a fishing family and belonged to a group called the Young Explorers when I was a kid. My Uncle Bud and Aunt Renee were the group’s leaders and along with my cousins Eddie and Bobby we fished the lakes and rivers in Minnesota. While raising my family the fishing thing got away from me until I joined the Sisters on the Fly and learned to fly fish. One of the best things about owning an RV is that I find myself choosing destinations based on the proximity to great fishing and when I am through fishing I get to go to my home away from home! Carole and I decided to hire a guide for the day to maximize our experience. We were lucky to have gotten the sought after Kai Williams of Awesome Adventures Charters who is a Hilton Head, South Carolina native who grew up on the salt marshes and oyster beds where we planned to fish for red fish. Kai had a 17’ Ranger flat bottomed skiff that allowed us to navigate in the shallows as the tide went out exposing the oyster beds. We spent a great day on the water watching the eagles swoop, red fish jump, and the American Oystercatcher birds secure their dinner. The fish weren’t biting that day but as they say in the fishing world, a bad day fishing beats the best day in the office any day of the week!

 

 

I had a great day on the salt marshes off of Hilton Head fishing on local guide Kai Williams 17′ flat skiff.

 

Part of the fun of belonging to an RV group is the fellowship with others in the RV world and those you meet when traveling. Every time the Sisters on the Fly are at a campground they garner a lot of attention with their festive trailers and love of travel. These ladies have stories to tell because they go places and do things and they take their little homes on wheels with them. The Rivers End Campground hosted the public to a Sisters on the Fly trailer tour with the proceeds going to a local charity. For several hours on Saturday morning the locals poured in from Tybee and Savannah to see the trailers and discover the places you can go when you have an RV.

 

 

The Sister on the Fly trailer tour did not disappoint. Sister Tammy Buchanan has collected everything a well heeled RVer might have owned for her 1970’s era trailer.

 

It’s always great sharing the fun with newbies and RV wannabes but in the end, the best part of any campout is always the quiet time around the campfire at night. It’s the time where we catch up with old friends and get to know new ones and when I am not camping, it’s the part I miss the most.

 

 

New sister Christine DeLong’s 1966 trailer is a page out of history and where we all settled in to enjoy the fire, ocean breezes and star filled sky.

 

 

 

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK

Growing up in the Midwest, I always thought of Olympic National Park as one of those places that “one day” I’ll get to experience. That day arrived…

There was just one problem – we only had two weeks to stay in this scenic paradise and there were too many great areas to explore! If this isn’t on your RV bucket list, you’d better add it.

One thing to keep in mind is Olympic National Park is HUGE. We set up our base camp at the Elwha Dam RV Park. It’s perfectly located to take day trips and hit all the great spots, but also is close enough to Seattle so that you can visit the big city as well.

First Beach

It seems fitting that the first place to visit is First Beach. It’s located in La Push. My wife warned me that I need to watch out for vampires as this is where they filmed the hit film series “Twilight.”

There are sea-stacks all around this beautiful beach as well as a lot of driftwood to sift through in search of unique pieces of wood. Because all of these beaches are far from the big cities, there are not a lot of people and you can easily find spots where you have it all to yourself.

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GO RVING TO THE REDWOODS

I want to start by letting you know that nothing I say can accurately describe how incredible the Redwoods are with the tallest trees in the world, but they’re so much more than that. To survive they need to be near the coast which puts them near countless rugged beaches. They also come in groves, which means you can walk through beautiful fern filled forests marveling at these giants. Mix in the fact that they’re in low population areas and you have a secluded adventurer’s paradise!

We lived for just under a month at the Klamath Camper Corral in Northern California. It’s hard to believe, but that wasn’t enough time to explore the area. It was enough time, however, to have adventures that we’ll look back on for the rest of our lives. It also was the perfect location to explore this incredible area.

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9 UNIQUE ACTIVITIES IN NATIONAL PARKS

When I think of National Parks, I think of beautiful landscapes, historical sites, and epic hikes. But if you take a look around, you’ll find that there are a ton of other activities, too. The more we explore, the more we find. Here are 9 unique activities you should check out.

Sandboard at Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado

You can hike up the tallest sand dunes in this park, but the fun part is coming down! Rent a sandboard and zoom down before climbing back up for another ride. Keep in mind that you will have to rent the boards outside of the park. See more here: http://localadventurer.com/great-sand-dunes-national-park-colorado/

 

Climb Into Cliff Dwellings at Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado

Mesa Verde National Park has some of the most remarkable geography. There are countless viewpoints where you can see the cliff dwellings from above, but if you book a tour, you can climb into them and stand where people did thousands of years ago. See more here: http://localadventurer.com/balcony-house-mesa-verde-national-park/

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