TOP 20 RECIPES FROM 20 YEARS OF RVING

Go RVing’s 20th anniversary celebration continues! We’ve tried a lot of RV recipes over the years, and we’ve compiled our top 20 favorites for the colder months below. After all, Thanksgiving is just around the corner.

Click the recipe name to get the full ingredient list and directions. Bon appétit!

 

1. Apple Cider

 

2. 2×4 Soup

 

3. Baked Corn

 

4. Betty’s Cherry Cobbler

 

5. Camp Pie

 

6. Challah French Toast with Caramel Sauce

 

7. Crockpot Hot Cocoa

 

8. Broccoli and Cheese Potatoes

 

9. Game Day Chili

 

10. Pie Iron Grilled Cheese

 

11. On the Road Again Sliders

 

12. Cast Iron Egg and Ham Cups

 

13. Huevos Rancheros

 

14. Comforting Chicken Stew

 

15. Pan-Seared Skirt Steak and Chimichurri

 

16. Grilled Peach and Pound Cake Kabobs

 

17. 3-Minute Fudge

 

18. Campfire Apple Pie

 

19. Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Muffins

 

20. HCR’s Homestead Cherry Chutney

 

 

Have a favorite RV recipe? Share yours in the comments below!

RVING FOR HISTORY BUFFS: 10 MUST SEE PLACES

When many people think about RVing they think of parking next to the lake for a weekend of fishing or heading to the mountains for hiking, but RVing is also the perfect way to get out and explore North America’s rich history.

We spent four years touring the United States in our RV. Much of that time was dedicated to visiting historical sites from Key West to Alaska and San Francisco to New York City and hundreds of places in between. Narrowing down my list to 10 places was next to impossible. It would have been much easier to write 100 Must See Places but for the sake of length and your time I whittled the list down to ten. I chose RV-friendly places in a variety of locations around the country and most have the added benefit of natural beauty for outdoor enthusiasts.

 

 

Boston, MA

For early American history, it doesn’t get much better than Boston. Boston is home to the Freedom Trail, a 2.5 mile marked path through downtown that passes by 16 historical significant locations. It starts at the Boston Commons and winds its way down to Bunker Hill. While not a part of the Freedom Trail, the Boston Tea Party Ships and Museum offers an

in- depth look at an event that changed the course of history. Not far from Boston you’ll also find Plymouth Plantation, a living history museum about the early settlement of Plymouth Colony. Campgrounds are limited to the outskirts of Boston. We’d recommend camping at one of the numerous campgrounds between Boston and Cape Cod so you can experience Boston’s history and spend a day or two experiencing the beauty of Cape Cod.

 

 

Charleston, SC

The history of Charleston, South Carolina is one of the most enduring in the country. Founded by the English in 1670, Charleston began as a small seaport settlement. By the 18th century it had grown into a wealthy city. The bloodiest four years in America began in April of 1861 when Confederate soldiers opened fire at Union-occupied Fort Sumter in the Charleston Harbor. The Civil War devastated Charleston but the lack of funds forced the city to repair instead of replace buildings thus preserving a large array of significant architecture. Start your visit at the Charleston Visitor Center for suggestions from their friendly and helpful staff and be sure to watch, Forever Charleston, to get an overview of the city’s history. Must-sees include Fort Sumpter National Monument, a walking tour of historic downtown self-guided or otherwise, Battery Park, and Charleston City Market. A handful of campgrounds are on the outskirts of the city including Edisto Beach State Park where you can camp on the coast. Or consider staying further south and add a day trip to Savannah, Georgia to your history tour.

 

 

Dearborn, MI

Located just outside Detroit, MI, Dearborn is a haven of history in the Midwest. The must-see attraction is The Henry Ford. The Henry Ford Museum of Innovation is nothing short of spectacular. Step onto the bus where Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat, see past presidential cars, learn about manufacturing, and even see early RVs. Head over to Greenfield Village where you can ride in a Model T, explore Thomas Edison’s lab, and see the workshop where the Wright brothers thought to reach for the sky. There are a number of campgrounds located outside the Detroit area. If you want to spend some time enjoying Lake Erie, we suggest Sterling State Park Campground located south of Dearborn on the lake.

 

 

New Orleans, LA

In 1803 the United States bought approximately 827,000 square miles of land for 15 million dollars from France. Known as the Louisiana Purchase, this territory located west of the Mississippi included New Orleans. New Orleans’ history is as rich and varied as its food. Stroll the famous French Quarter and visit the St. Louis Cathedral. Built in 1724, St Louis is the oldest continuously active Catholic cathedral in the United States. Ride one of the continuously operating streetcars in the world. You’ll also find museums galore including The New Orleans Jazz National Historic Park and The National World War II Museum. As for places to camp you’ll find RV parks within walking distance to the French Quarter or pick one of the many nearby campgrounds located and drive in for the day. For more tips on visiting New Orleans with kids check out RVing in New Orleans.

 

 

Philadelphia, PA

A history trip isn’t complete without a visit to our nation’s first capitol city, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The main course is Independence National Historic Park. Independence NHP is an urban park that contains historical delights like the Liberty Bell, the Benjamin Franklin Museum, Carpenter’s Hall, and Independence Hall, where both the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed. In addition, there are many other smaller sites that commemorate the people and places of our rich history. Consider visiting nearby Valley Forge located northeast of the Philadelphia to learn more about place where the American Continental Army spent the harsh winter 1777 and 1778. Campgrounds are speckled all around the city, including one in downtown.

 

 

Santa Fe, NM

Santa Fe is the oldest capitol city in the United States and the oldest European community west of the Mississippi. Explore ancient Native Americans petroglyphs or visit the Palace of the Governors, one of the nation’s oldest government buildings. Currently, the Palace of the Governors serves as New Mexico’s History Museum. Just outside of the city, you’ll find Pecos National Historical Park where the remains of Indian Pueblos teach us about the ancient peoples who once thrived in this high desert. History, art, and culture are rich in Santa Fe and there are plenty of outdoor adventures to be had as well. All of this makes it a wonderful stop for RVing history buffs.

 

 

St. Augustine, FL

Along the sandy shores of the Atlantic in northern Florida, lies the oldest permanent European settlement in the United States, St Augustine. St. Augustine was founded in by Spanish conquistador, Don Pedro Menendez de Aviles, in 1565. St. Augustine has been the home to a wide array of cultures from Native Americans, Spanish settlers, British soldiers, and unconventional millionaires, all who have left their mark on this beautiful coastal city. Visit the Castillo de San Marcos, a 17th-century Spanish fortress, walk through the historic district, and spend time at the beach. If you can get a spot (reserve early), stay at Anastasia State Park located across Matanzas Bay from downtown St. Augustine.

 

 

Washington DC

Of course, no list of best places for history buffs is complete without our nation’s capital city, Washington D.C. It might surprise you that Washington D.C. is very RV friendly. Well, you won’t be parking on the National Mall, but there are plenty of options nearby making an RV trip to Washington D.C. educational and affordable! The list of attractions in D.C. is long and ever growing so plan accordingly. For an in depth look at our favorite places to visit while RVing Washington D.C. check out this post.

 

 

Williamsburg, VA

Known as the Historic Triangle, Williamsburg, Virginia is where American history comes alive. You’ll be able to walk through and touch hundreds of years of history in the living history museums. From the Native Americans who first called this area home to the first settlers founding Jamestown in 1607 to the Battle of Yorktown, history is thick around Williamsburg. Plan on spending multiple days to tour Historic Jamestown, Jamestown Settlement, Colonial Williamsburg, American Revolutionary Museum at Yorktown, and Yorktown Battlefield. There are a number of campgrounds to choose from in the area. I promise you won’t be disappointed.

 

 

Yellowstone National Park, WY, ID, MT

National parks and RVing are like ice cream and cake. They just fit together. Established in 1872, Yellowstone National Park is America’s first national park and, depending on who you ask, the second oldest in the world. This history with its unmatched geological wonders makes it a must see for RVers. Be sure to attend a ranger program or two discussing the history of the park. It’s fascinating to hear how conservancy and culture has changed over the years. Today you wouldn’t think of intentionally feeding bears but back in the 1900s it was a common occurrence and there are pictures to prove it! You’ll find numerous campgrounds located in and around the park. If possible plan a visit early or late in the season to avoid crowds.

Are you a history buff? Where are some of your favorite places to Go RVing?

 

 

RVING TO SANTA BARBARA

 

If you follow me on Instagram, you may have seen all my RV road trip stories a few weeks back! My boyfriend Jesse and I rented an RV and drove up to Santa Barbara for a weekend of delicious food, yoga, wandering, shopping and…more delicious food.

 

 

Let’s back up, though. Have you ever been on a RV trip? Because I don’t think I had ever even been inside of an RV before this trip! I’ve always been super interested in them though. I’ve been infatuated with the Tiny House movement, and only a month or two after meeting Jesse, we started talking about what it would be like to buy, renovate, and cruise the country in an RV or school bus or something of the sort.

 

Neither of us is handy AT ALL, nor do we have any RV or large bus experience, but we’re both in love with the idea of taking off and exploring while we’re young, wild and free, and still can. I want to retrofit a gorgeous kitchen into a school bus and take off, and while I never thought I’d find someone who shared the sentiment, Jesse’s totally into the idea. But first, we knew we needed to get in an RV and actually have some experience in a giant, liveable vehicle before considered our own adventure. Which is why it seemed like FATE when GoRVing  got in touch through  CLEVER and wanted to do a RV-themed foodie roadtrip post! I couldn’t say HECK YES fast enough!

 

 

We booked the RV through Outdoorsy, which is like AirBNB for RVs, and found the “Leamon Party Bus”, which was cutely decorated and just the right size (24 feet) for first time RVers like ourselves. The morning we left for our trip, Corey, the RV owner, gave us SUCH a thorough walk-through of the RV and showed us how to do everything we needed – drive it around, hook it up, and use the kitchen. Thankfully for me, you have to be 25 to be insured so Jesse had to do all the driving  but as soon as we got on the road, he lost his nerves and had a super easy time driving it around.

One of the best parts about RVing was being able to stop anywhere we wanted, and essentially have our hotel room with us. En route to Santa Barbara, we stopped for acai bowls in San Clemente at Juice My Heart, and sat at our kitchen table on the side of a road in air conditioning to eat them. #RVperk, for sure.

I had also been itching to go to Erewhon Market for ages – it’s a healthier grocery store in LA that has tons of unique, delicious products and a prepared foods section that blew my mind. Think: gluten free mac and cheese, vegan “meatballs”, SO many soups, and the best turmeric cauliflower I’ve ever had. I loaded up on tons of healthier products I’d never seen before, or had seen online and never been able to find in stores. It was my food heaven, and since we were in no rush, we spent the better part of an hour meandering the aisles and getting snacks to fuel us for the rest of the drive. We also picked up a bunch of prepared foods and had lunch in the parking lot. The journey is definitely as important as the destination when you’re in an RV.

Jesse managed to back the RV up into it’s spot in the RV park in ONE GO! What a pro 😉 we got everything hooked up with no issues and went off to explore, shop…and find more food. Before the trip, I surveyed you guys on where we should go in SB and you guys HOOKED IT UP. After a long wander around Santa Barbara on Friday evening, we headed off to Mesa Verde for dinner. And OMG. Dreams do come true. Pretty much everything on the menu is gluten-free, and it’s all vegan, with vegan cheese galore. My dairy-free heart was singing.

 

 

We started with picadillo empanadas, which were filled with butternut squash cheese, cacao black beans, chimichurri, and pickled carrots and cabbage. Next up was my favorite: the summer vegetable pasta with zucchini noodles, heirloom tomatoes, mushrooms, black kale, macadamia ricotta, and cashew parmesan. The ricotta and parm were out of this world good. Last was the gluten-free vegan pizza with smoked eggplant, marinara, cashew cheese, tempeh bacon, caramelized onion, heirloom tomato, and basil – it was amazing, but we were so full at that point that we had to bring it home. Luckily, we could do that because we had a fridge in our RV 🙂 we rolled back home incredibly full and satisfied and slept like babies in the super comfortable bed.

 

 

I woke up bouncing with excitement for Saturday’s activities: the day before we had found Santa Barbara’s himalayan salt cave, which is the biggest of the sort in the US, and signed up for a yoga class IN THE CAVE. There was only four of us in the flowing class, which was in the dimly lit salt cave, surrounded by himalayan pink salt covering the walls, ceiling, and floor. Himalayan salt is known for being incredibly healing, and being surrounded by it provided a sense of calmness and magic in the class. We had gone into the class a little anxious, and left smiling, entirely rejuvenated. You can see a peek of my terrible, unstretched scorpion pose above  (also, it’s totally not called a scorpion in yoga, that’s what it’s called in cheer and I never remember it’s yoga name.)

 

 

Post-yoga was lunch at Green Table – another gluten-free, mostly vegan lunch spot that had out of this world matcha drinks. I got a salted caramel matcha latte and the vegan veggie parmesan, which was a quinoa burger topped with sunflower almond dressing (that baked up similar to a delicious ricotta), tomato, basil, spinach, nutritional yeast, and Italian herbs. Jesse opted for a matcha green juice and the Green Table burger: a quinoa veggie burger, with house dressing, cauliflower bread (!!!), avocado, Dijon, lettuce, tomato, and goat gouda cheese. You guys, I’d happily be vegan if I could eat that meal every day.

 

 

A trip to the local farmer’s market followed, and I marveled in the beautiful sights: plump and firm heirloom tomatoes, a gorgeous array of greens, the first of the year’s apples, and plants galore. There were vendors selling house plants (we bought a new fiddle leaf fig tree for $20 – her name is Barb) and every type of herb you could imagine. I couldn’t resist picking up some of the farmer’s most beautiful produce to bring home with me.

Anyone ever had a jujube?! I had never seen these before!

 

 

We dropped off our goodies at the RV (in the photo just above, you can see Barb all wrapped up in paper in the messy RV) and went back into town to wander some more and do a little shopping. Jesse ended up feeling a little sick, so we grabbed a quick dinner at The Natural Cafe (I forgot to take photos ) – a lettuce-wrapped turkey burger for me, and enchiladas for him. He ended up having no appetite once the food was on the table, so Jesse’s dinner ended up getting gifted to a homeless man we saw outside and we had a quiet, low-key night in, just hanging out.

 

Sunday morning was supposed to be hiking day, but sadly, Jesse still wasn’t feeling up to it. I took a walk to the local grocery store to get some olive oil and came back to make us a little salad with our farmer’s market finds from the day before. Tragically, I had the refrigerator set to be too cold and the lettuce froze  but I ended up skipping the lettuce and tossing together sliced peaches, halved baby heirloom tomatoes, and GIANT blackberries with some salt, pepper, olive oil and lemon. Soooo easy and sooo delicious – I’ve left the quick and easy recipe at the bottom of the post. You can see some photos of me styling below (yes, I brought my own bowls…), as well as the final product. 🙂

 

As we would later find out, he was having a minor bout with strep, but he was a champ and we went to Backyard Bowls for acai bowls anyways, before packing up. I couldn’t not go to Backyard Bowls, since pretty much every. single. message. that I got with Santa Barbara recommendations insisted I go. You guys were not wrong – my green bowl was BOMB. It had ginger and lime juice in it, which added such a nice kick of spiciness and tartness to the usually sweet bowl.

 

After our bowls, we got packed up, unhooked the RV, and got back on the road! We made another stop at Erewhon for some more lunch goodies (and promptly devoured a whole container of the most amazing herb-y potatoes EVER) and delivered the RV back to Corey in surprisingly, pretty pristine condition.

 

So, the conclusion? I’m an RVing convert – I would totally do it again, and taking off in a converted bus or RV is just as appealing as ever. It’s a super affordable way to travel, especially if you own your own RV, and it’s so convenient having all the comforts of home at your fingertips. No dealing with lugging bags around, or not being able to keep your delicious leftovers because your hotel room doesn’t have a fridge or way to heat them back up. It also let us be more spontaneous with where we could go and what we could do – we never had to worry about catching a flight or not fitting something into our bags. Freedom is something I’m always after on a trip, and RVing provides the best of it. You can bet this won’t be my last RV trip!

 

 

Simple Peach Tomato Salad

– 1 cup heirloom cherry tomatoes halved

– 1 large peach pitted and cubed

– 1/2 cup fresh berries of choice I used blackberries

– 1/4 cup toasted pecans chopped

– 1/2 fresh lemon

– 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

– Salt & pepper to taste

1) In a bowl, combine the tomatoes, cubes of peach, berries, and pecans. Squeeze the lemon over the top and drizzle with olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Toss together and serve immediately.

 

I was selected for this opportunity as a member of CLEVER and the content and opinions expressed here are all my own.

 

7 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD HAVE BOUGHT AN RV BY NOW

I never thought I would be such an RV advocate. Heck, I never thought I would live in one full-time. Traveling the country in a Winnebago wasn’t on my bucket list.

However, the past few years RVing have enabled Heath and I to travel all over America, live incredibly cheap so we could pay off more than $15k of student debt, and attain a crash course education in “how to live in a small space with your spouse 101” (lesson #239: learn to forgive your husband when he accidently locks you in the shower for 30 minutes).

Like most people, I didn’t dream of growing up and living in a motorhome. Yet it’s literally been the vehicle that has allowed us to cross so many adventures off our bucket list and live an incredible life.

If you are someone who isn’t sure whether the RV lifestyle is for you, I wanted to share 7 reasons why you should’ve bought an RV by now.

  1. You love the outdoors.

 

 Photo cred: Joe Hendricks

When your ideal getaway involves a state park, a campfire, and s’mores, you know that RV life would suit you perfectly.

Our favorite part of full-time RVing is the chance to spend more time outside, whether we’re hiking, kayaking, or just taking a nap in the hammock. Best of all, this keeps us more active and healthier on the road.

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RVING THROUGH THE GRAND CIRCLE

The Grand Circle has to be one of the most epic road trips in America, and it’s even more enjoyable when done in an RV! Located in the Southwestern United States and encompassing portions of five states, The Grand Circle road trip features diverse scenery across five states and America’s largest concentration of national parks. One of my personal favorite portions of the drive is along Highway 12, the All-American Road. The views of the orange hoodoos (tall thin spires of rock protruding from the bottom of the basin), red canyons, green forests, mountains and many of the state and national parks within Utah – but that’s just a small part of the adventure!

 

 

I was in my Thor Vegas motorhome, towing my Mini Cooper Countryman when I took this trip, so it is suitable for most RV sizes. I had not seen landscapes like this growing up on the east coast, so I was blown away by this trip. I hope you enjoy it as well.

 

 

Trip Summary 

  • 942 Miles; 20 Stops 
    • 3-4 states depending on where you start (NV, AZ, UT, CO)
    • 9-10 National Park areas
    • 5 State Parks

 

Sites in Arizona

  • Grand Canyon National Park – North Rim
  • Glen Canyon National Recreational Area – Lake Powell (AZ/UT border)
  • Monument Valley (AZ/UT border)

 

 

Sites in Utah

  • Zion National Park
  • Bryce Canyon National Park
  • Capitol Reef National Park
  • Arches National Park
  • Canyonlands National Park
  • Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument
  • Cedar Breaks National Monument

 

Sites in Colorado

  • Mesa Verde National Park

 

Camping Hubs

If you want to leave the RV and explore with your toad vehicle, you can see many places within a radius of these two cities.

  • Moab, UT
  • Kanab, UT

 

Sample Two-Week Itinerary 

If flying in and renting an RV consider these airports to start your trip

  • Las Vegas
  • Phoenix/Flagstaff
  • Salt Lake City

 

The following itinerary assumes a start from Las Vegas

 

 

 

Day 1 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 2 & 3

 

 

 

Day 4

 

Day 5 

 

 

 

 

Day 6 – 8 

 

 

 

Day 9

 

 

 

Day 10 

  • Drive to Capitol Reef National Park visitor center then do the scenic loop
  • On the drive, make sure you stop at Kiva Coffee House off Highway 12. This place is super cute and offers great views of Grand Staircase Escalante while you sip on an espresso. They also have food, a little jewelry counter perfect for picking out souvenirs, and they allow overnight stops.
  • If you prefer to drive straight through – I recommended setting up camp at Kodachrome State Park 

 

 

 

Day 11 & 12

Ruby’s Inn Campground or in the park

  • Scenic Loop Drive with 9 points of interest

 

 

 

Day 13 & 14 

 

 

 

Day 15 

  • Return to Vegas and remember all the fun you had!

 

Extra Stops If You Have The Time

The national parks you’ll see in my trip itinerary below are stunners, but these state parks are also worth checking out if you have extra time. This entire area is just so rich in beauty!

  • Horseshoe Bend, Page, AZ
  • Antelope Canyon, Page, AZ
  • Goosenecks State Park after Monument Valley
  • Dead Horse Point State Park on the way to Canyonlands, Moab, UT
  • La Sal Mountain Loop drive in Moab
  • Goblin Valley State Park after Moab
  • Kodachrome State Park before Bryce
  • Sand Hollow State Park, Hurricane, UT

 

 

Make today “someday” and take this trip of a lifetime!

 

Let me know in the comments if any of you have taken this trip or have additional itinerary suggestions.

 

See more great Destination Inspiration from my fellow Go RVing bloggers here.