GO RVING OFF THE GRID AND AWAY: BOONDOCKING TIPS AND TRICKS


Our boondocking spot in Moab, Utah

 

Imagine stepping out your RV door and being greeted by a wide-open vista. Or sitting around a campfire under a desert sky filled with so many stars that for a moment you are left breathless. This is our AWAY and it’s often found in remote places where no outlets or water spigots exist.

Referred to as dry camping, wild camping, dispersed camping, or off-the-grid camping, boondocking in an RV is simply staying at a place without water, electricity, or sewer. Knowing how to make the most of your resources can go a long way. Being able to boondock efficiently will not only help save you money (even if that just means a quick overnight in a parking lot) but it opens up a whole new world of adventure as you explore our some of America’s untouched beauty.

So pull your chair up to the campfire as we share our tips and tricks to help make your next boondocking adventure one you’ll want to repeat.

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A NEW ENGLAND RV ADVENTURE

Editor’s note: Heather K. has been RVing for a couple of years, and in that time she has traveled to 15 states, RVed with friends across the country, and fell in love with RVing as a way of life. She loves traveling with her husband and two kids, but drags her friends into any travel opportunity possible. Her motto is always, “the more the merrier.”  You can find her adventures on her blog Mamas Spot.

As the leaves start changing and cool crisp air rolls in I start getting antsy to hit the road and soak it all in. It’s time to leave the city and see some amazing fall beauty. The place I want to be whisked away to is New England, for it has some of the best foliage in the world. The best way, and in my opinion, the only way to see all that New England has to offer is by RV. There is no better way to revel in the most unforgettable trip you will ever take. If you haven’t seen fall foliage in New England you haven’t really seen fall and if you haven’t done it in an RV you haven’t done it right! When visiting New England in the fall you will want to give yourself at least a week to do it. We decided to embark on our journey mid-October; going at this time had its challenges and its upsides. We found that a lot of the RV campgrounds have closed by the beginning of October or sooner, but that didn’t stop us from having a great time, and with more RV campgrounds closed it just meant that we weren’t fighting our way through other tourists.

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