TAKE A TRIP TO YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK

In 2009 when Ken Burns and Dayton Duncan premiered their Emmy award winning documentary, “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea,” I was riveted to the screen every Sunday night of its run. All of the parks are beautiful in their own way and I hope to someday make it to all of them, but when it came time to start checking off that list I began with Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, America’s first park.

 

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12 TIPS & TOOLS TO RV SAFELY

As a solo female full time RVer, safety is the topic I am most often asked about. People are curious – do you feel safe, do you pack or carry a firearm, what have you run into?

 

I’ve only had one incident where my gut told me something was off. I was in Canada in a Walmart parking lot. It was mainly empty, just one other RV and a group of cars in the far corner with young kids hanging out. I started to hear yelling followed by honking as the people in the cars wanted to make the RVers unwelcome.   I followed the example of the other RV and left. I continued on until I reached a truck stop that had an area for RV overnighting. I checked inside just to be sure and then settled in safely for the night.

 

While startling and inconvenient this was a minor incident because I made the decision to relocate and not to stay. Beyond that, my experience with traveling in the RV for the past two and half years has been overwhelmingly positive. I don’t take that for granted though, I take precautions and have put in place a few “just in case” measures.

 

Safety Tips & Tools

 

  1. Trust Your Gut – The most important safety tools are ones you have with you at all times – your eyes, ears and common sense! Be aware of your surroundings, trust your instincts, and your gut/intuition. I remember on the Oprah Show years ago when she had the author of “The Gift of Fear” on and spoke about how important it is to listen to that inner voice. I believe most people are good, but that does not preclude taking precautions.

 

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WEEKLONG ROAD TRIP PLANNING AND SMALL SPACE LIVING TIPS AND TRICKS

TRIP PLANNING FOR THE WEEKLONG ROAD TRIP

Over the years we have learned what works and what doesn’t when planning for weeklong road trips.  I hope you find my tips and tricks below useful when planning your next road trip!

The Destination

 

 

When we decide on our destination, we like to reach out to the local chamber of commerce to help us get an idea of things to do in the area.  They are always so very helpful and often times send us a packet full of brochures that you can pour over while planning your trip.   They also don’t hesitate to share hidden gems and “must see” attractions and sometimes can even provide full day itineraries.

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A BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO EARNING A REMOTE INCOME

There’s never been a better time to make a living while traveling the country full-time in an RV. Companies are hiring more remote positions now than ever. Nomads are making a full-time living by freelancing with websites like Fiverr, eLance or Upwork. Plus, there’s this whole group of people who are running their own respective businesses while traveling the country.

This creates an awesome opportunity for anyone who wants a meaningful career, but also loves the idea of skipping around national parks and working from anywhere with a Wi-Fi connection.

People like my wife Alyssa and I fit into this category.

 

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4 EXERCISES TO REVITALIZE AFTER A LONG DAY OF DRIVING

If you feel like you’re tapped out of energy and your brain is mush after a long drive, join the club. I’m most definitely a member of THAT club, albeit unwillingly.

 

“Must-somehow-get-out-of-this-chair…”

 

Post-drive drowsiness is a real thing RVers have to deal with. We can blame our human physiology. Sitting for long periods slows circulation, which our body misinterprets as us attempting to fall asleep. It tries to help…by making us sleepy. Even though it’s probably the last thing you feel like doing at the end of a drive, exercise is a great way to wake back up and get your body functioning as it should be.

 

Here are 4 fantastic energy-producing exercises to try after your next road trip. Each one counteracts the joint compression that occurs from the sitting position, and will give you a caffeine-like boost to make you more alert. You’ll be able to tackle those hook-ups, set up your camp, AND get the campfire going like a champ.

 

FORWARD-LUNGE KICKWALK:

Begin with your left leg lunged forwards and your hands behind your head. Smoothly shift your weight onto the left leg as you lift your right leg and kick it forward before placing it down in a right-leg forward lunge. Continue to repeat taking alternating lunge steps forward, and kicking your leg before setting it down. Do 12 steps. Do this exercise slowly.

 

TABLE PLANKED KNEE CRUNCHES:

Place your hands on the table top and step your feet away so that your body is planked diagonally. Lift your left knee and lower your head as if trying to get your knee and nose to meet. Draw your belly button back towards your spine and allow your spine to round. Then, extend your left leg back and up without touching it down and lift your head so that your face is slightly angled up to the sky. Do 12, and then repeat on your right side.

 

 

CLAPPING WALL PUSHUPS:

Place your hands slightly wider than shoulder-width and step your feet back as far as you feel comfortable so you’re in a diagonal plank. Spread your fingers and turn them slightly in. Perform a pushup making sure your hips stay aligned with the rest of your body, your elbows come out to the sides, and your heels rise off the ground. Next, forcefully push yourself away from the wall until you’re standing with control and clap once. Repeat 12 times.

 

SIDE-LUNGE JACKS:

Stand with good upright posture, feet together, arms straight out so you’re making a “T”. Lunge sideways to the right, and bring your left hand to your right leg (advanced, touch your ankle; beginner, don’t lunge as deeply, just touch your inner thigh). Make sure on the lunge, you turn your toe out at a diagonal and ensure your knee follows the same pathway as the toe.  You want your non-lunging leg to remain straight. Step your feet back together, and now repeat the move on the left side, so that you are alternating sides each lunge. Repeat the move 12 times (once to the right and once to the left equals one repetition).

 

 

THAT’s all there is to it! And really, you don’t have to wait until the drive’s over to do these exercises. Try them throughout your drive each time you stop! The more you move throughout a long day of driving, the less extreme the post-drive fatigue will be. And who wants to be tired when you’re on an RV adventure!!!

Happy and healthy travels, all!

 

Trainer Stef from The Fit RV