THE MOST AMAZING CAMPGROUNDS FOR STARGAZING WITH THE KIDS

Part of the romance of camping is the chance to sleep under the stars. But due to the ever-growing light pollution in this country, campgrounds with really stellar stargazing are rare. On average, city residents can only see a handful of stars. People living in really rural areas may be able to see a couple thousand. But there are a few spots left in the country where you’ll be able to see up to 10,000 stars (and maybe even some planets!) with just the naked eye. It can hardly be surprising that the best sites can be found within our national parks, where civilization is kept at bay. One of best ways to choose a stargazing destination is to find a Dark Sky Park. Parks can be certified a Dark Sky Park on a national and international level. With that in mind, here are a few of the best spots in the US to see the stars:

 

Pennsylvania’s Cherry Springs State Park

 

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This Pennsylvania State Park is the darkest and most remote spot east of the Mississippi. The high elevation and the fact that the viewing field is on a plateau means that you’ll have a 360-degree view of the skies around you– perfect for stellar stargazing! It was the first park to be certified as Dark Sky in the US and the second in the world. On a clear night, you’ll be able to see ten thousand stars and have a vivid view of the Milky Way. There are easily accessible viewing areas if you only want to visit for a few hours, or you could spend the night in one of the park’s campsites. One of the most popular events is the Black Forest Star Party, which attracts hundreds of astronomers every year.

 

California’s Death Valley National Park

 

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5 NATIONAL PARKS YOUR KIDS WILL LOVE

The National Park Service was established in 1916 and consists of over 400 parks covering more than 80 million acres. In 2014, these parks saw nearly 300,000,000 visitors. National parks are a perfect place to experience nature, learn about our history, pursue favorite pastimes and find your AWAY.

After 3 and half years of full time RVing, we’ve been to nearly a fourth of the parks. We’ve walked the battlefields of Gettysburg and under the giant sequoias in California with many stops in between. While we have enjoyed aspects of each park, there are a few that stand out as places that kids (and adults) will especially love.

Yellowstone National Park

I’m embarrassed to admit it, but I had low expectations for America’s first and most visited national park, Yellowstone National Park. I had heard about the crowds (I’m not a crowd person) and assumed the park was overrated. I was wrong. We all LOVED our time in Yellowstone. Thing 1 and Thing 2 both agreed that it was their second favorite National Park.

 

 

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333 MILES OF BEAUTY

Many of you have offered suggestions on the Go RVing Facebook page during our journey from Key West, Florida to Alaska. We want you to know we are genuinely thankful. We’ve seen so many amazing places by following your suggestions and Talkeetna was no exception!IMG_5520

We stayed in Talkeetna Camper Park, a short walk from downtown Talkeetna.

talkeetna-collage-alaskaTalkeetna is a small town off the Parks Highway. It’s a hub for adventures with many sight seeing, river rafting, and zip lining companies based in town. Most climbing expeditions to Mount McKinley (Denali) begin here.

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SEEING “THE MOUNTAIN” AND OTHER ALASKA SURPRISES

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You can’t drive over 5,000 miles into the Northern Hemisphere without stopping at the Santa Claus House in the North Pole. Unfortunately, Santa had taken the day off, but it was still a fun place to get an Alaskan Christmas ornament and a good stop for fudge. But, could a stop involving fudge ever be bad?

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Upon arriving in Fairbanks, we headed over to Pioneer Park. Pioneer Park allows RVs to stay in their parking lot for up to four days for a reasonable fee. They even have a place to fill up water and Wi-Fi.

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