TOP 20 DESTINATIONS

To celebrate 20 years of Go RVing, we asked YOU to share your favorite places to RV.  Explore these spots, and leave us a comment with favorite places too!

1. Submitted by JoAnn T.

St. Ignace, MI. Tiki RV Park. St. Ignace is just over the bridge from Mackinaw City, MI. It sits on the edge of Lake Huron. Everywhere you go you see the beauty of the water, marina, and lighthouse. The downtown is a beautiful place along the waterfront. We spent 11 days there for the 4th of July.

Link to campground: http://www.tikirvpark.com/

 

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SHALL WE GATHER AT THE RIVER?

Shall we gather at the river?

Where bright angel feet have trod

With its crystal tide forever

Flowing by the throne of God

Robert Lowry, 1864

 

The subtle influence of grandmothers is a topic for poets and psychologists alike. It can supply strength when you think you have none.  It can also carry a loving imprint that tells you who you are no matter what the world seems to be telling you. More often than not, this benevolence comes in the form of an unconditional love. It’s conveyed by the mere “doing” of grandmotherly things. The ironing of a special dress, the unasked for purchase of the item you’ve been eyeing, the cookies on the porch when you most need a friend. Grandmothers have a way of filling the gap. It’s what makes us still miss them decades after they are gone, still think of them when eating a family recipe perfected by them, and still wish we had one more afternoon to just be with them.

Debra Facer, like so many of us, had such a Grandma. Her life would have seemed ordinary to many but she planted seeds of comfort in Debra. Those seeds would bloom when needed and the fragrance of that bloom would remind her of just how extraordinary her grandmother was. The seeds that Debra’s grandmother Dealia, and also her mother Joann, planted in her would bloom and help her to survive childlessness, widowhood at 37 and an ovarian cancer diagnosis.

Dealia the way Debra remembers her – loving life!

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ADVENTURE – A GIFT FOR US ALL

Whenever I share I was born and raised in Alaska I wait for the reaction. Nine times out of ten I will be met with a look of surprise followed by an emphatic, “Really?!” Amused, I’ll watch the wheels quietly spin in their mind with the question I know they want to ask, but they aren’t sure how. Most of the time they don’t. Most will then begin to ask me questions regarding if the cold and darkness rumors are true. But some are more bold. I’ll never forget the first time someone paused for a minute and said, “I’m sorry, but…there are Black people in Alaska?”

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ONE RV ADVENTURE TO HAVE WITH YOUR KIDS IN EVERY STATE BEFORE THEY GROW UP

Image via Flickr/H. Micheal Miley

 

Alabama

Go to Space Camp. Rocket scientist Dr. Wernher von Braun wanted a place to inspire kids about space travel, and the result was Space Camp, where kids participate in simulated missions, experience what gravity feels like on the moon, and spin themselves silly on the multi-axis trainer.

 

Alaska

Go dogsledding. Whether you want to see the northern lights, explore Denali National Park or visit a glacier, get there by dogsled. The cold air in your face as you glide across the snow…there’s nothing else like it. Mush!

 

Arizona

Camp out in the Grand Canyon. But don’t stare at it for five minutes and then wonder, “Now what?” There are plenty of wonders waiting to be discovered inside the canyon. Climb down and explore, then spend the night under the stars at Mather Campground.

 

Arkansas

Dig for diamonds. Visit Crater of Diamonds State Park to find your own gemstones. It’s the only diamond-producing site in the world that is open to the public, so start digging!

 

California

 

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THE MOST AMAZING CAMPGROUNDS FOR STARGAZING WITH THE KIDS

Part of the romance of camping is the chance to sleep under the stars. But due to the ever-growing light pollution in this country, campgrounds with really stellar stargazing are rare. On average, city residents can only see a handful of stars. People living in really rural areas may be able to see a couple thousand. But there are a few spots left in the country where you’ll be able to see up to 10,000 stars (and maybe even some planets!) with just the naked eye. It can hardly be surprising that the best sites can be found within our national parks, where civilization is kept at bay. One of best ways to choose a stargazing destination is to find a Dark Sky Park. Parks can be certified a Dark Sky Park on a national and international level. With that in mind, here are a few of the best spots in the US to see the stars:

 

Pennsylvania’s Cherry Springs State Park

 

Image Courtesy here

 

This Pennsylvania State Park is the darkest and most remote spot east of the Mississippi. The high elevation and the fact that the viewing field is on a plateau means that you’ll have a 360-degree view of the skies around you– perfect for stellar stargazing! It was the first park to be certified as Dark Sky in the US and the second in the world. On a clear night, you’ll be able to see ten thousand stars and have a vivid view of the Milky Way. There are easily accessible viewing areas if you only want to visit for a few hours, or you could spend the night in one of the park’s campsites. One of the most popular events is the Black Forest Star Party, which attracts hundreds of astronomers every year.

 

California’s Death Valley National Park

 

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