When Natalie Campanella left the cold corridors of NYC life for sunny southern California in her early twenties, she knew that she wanted to live in a place in which she could “be outdoors” year round. In her mind she harbored the idea that someday, somehow, she would be in a place where she could explore the west coast from San Diego to Canada and beyond. She imagined the sweet life songwriters and poets wax about when extolling the virtues of southern California, a place where it never rains and the days are longer and the nights are stronger than moonshine, a place where dreamers go to live.


Natalie grew up in the Midwest in a camping family, the youngest of seven siblings. She took into adulthood vivid childhood memories of the rocky Canadian beaches of Newfoundland and of spelunking in the cold, dark caves of Kentucky with her six siblings and five cousins who joined her family each year on their camping pilgrimages. Long car rides in the family station wagon before seat belts and air conditioning. Rolling through the miles with the windows down and kids sprawled all over each other. Eight track cassettes with the Beatles Greatest Hits. Coleman lanterns and the parental warning to not touch it when lit! Mosquito bites dotted with calamine lotion and with an “x” dug into them with a fingernail. That and moms sympathy being the standard remedy of the day. Shorts and tees by day, and jeans and hoodies by night. Campfires, sing-a-longs, toasted marshmallows and lightning bugs in jars. Natalie stored all these memories and hoped to one day add to them.


Natalie (the middle hooded child!) with her siblings on a family camping trip in Fish Creek, Wisconsin


Post-college life has a way of getting really busy, really fast and Natalie’s life was no exception. Natalie’s move to the West Coast took her to Santa Monica where she continued pursuing the performing arts while working in the legal department of a large corporate real estate agency. In New York she had been a regular performer at the 1980s famed punk rock and improv venue, CBGB’s, in the East Village.  Her free time on the west coast was spent at an orphanage in Tijuana, Mexico where she helped the founders raise not only money, but also the spirits of the 100 children who lived there. She was free to “be outside” all the time and ran the LA marathon with her Tijuana “kids” in mind. She raised enough money through sponsorships to contribute to the purchase of a used school bus to take the kids on outings off the orphanage grounds. She knew that exposure to nature has healing effects. She went to her bosses so often with charity projects and fundraising ideas that they eventually made her the manager of the nonprofit within the company. For the next 10 years, she raised funds through the company real estate offices and provided services and assistance to countless individuals and groups until the corporate office changed its structure in 2015 and the job was eliminated. For the first time since graduating from college, she was unemployed.

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It’s not uncommon for new full time RVers to wonder what they got themselves into once they hit the road and run into their first relationship speed bump. When people find out we live and travel together full time in an RV we get mixed reactions. Most people think it’s a cool way to see the country, others think we’re nuts to be around each other so much in a tight space!

Traveling with your significant other should bring you closer together and increase your overall life satisfaction. A few years ago I read that the #1 determining factor of a person’s happiness is the quality of the relationship with their significant other. If that’s true, than it makes sense to me that we should be intentional in how we manage that aspect of our lives.



After traveling for 2 years, visiting 36 states, having a baby and growing stronger in our marriage than ever before, we’ve put together a few tips on things that work for us in hopes people can get a gem or two that works for them.



I believe that communication is the key to any relationship. When you’re living in a small space, it’s even more critical. Everyone has their moments, moods, hormones. When you know you’re feeling stressed or just need some time, let your partner know. Most people don’t mind accommodating others, but they hate surprises. I’d rather know someone is in a bad mood and prepare to be the diffuser/bigger person than be thrown off and react.



Camper Tip: Just relax. Most likely there were things you thought were the end of your world 10 years ago and they ended up being a small blip on the bigger picture of your life.

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From Blue Spring and Silver Spring to Wekiwa Springs and Juniper Spring, this is the ultimate Florida “spring” break!


Image via Flickr/National Forests in Florida


Swimming in a natural spring is like nothing else. The water is so clear and perfect; you’ll never want to settle for a swimming pool again! Florida has an abundance of gorgeous springs, so pack your reusable water bottles and swimsuits and explore some of the best spots in the state.


Warm Mineral Springs


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Image via Flickr/Ekke


Vacationing with kids is always fun— but it can also be a challenge, too. Finding stuff to keep them entertained, but also engaged is key to making your family trip a success… and if they’re tired of the same old museums and state parks, it’s time to start thinking outside the box when planning a family vacation. Luckily, we’ve gathered a list of unusual and exciting places that kids and adults alike will love. Get out there and get exploring!


Natural Waterslides


If your kids love waterslides, but standing in line for hours isn’t your cup of tea, check out these gorgeous natural waterslides. Meadow Run in Pennsylvania’s Ohiopyle State Park has slowly been earning a reputation as one of the best natural waterslides in the country. Its long corkscrew waterway dumps you into a shallow pool at the end. It can move you pretty fast, so you might want to wear jeans to protect your skin! This park offers RV-friendly camping, making this a great weekend trip during the summer.


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We’ve all been there…



…a long day on the road after a great adventure, pulling into a new city you’ve never visited before, you’re both hungry and have lost the ability to civilly communicate between yourselves. It’s not pretty. We’ve definitely “been there, done that,” which is why we’re here to try to help you avoid the frustration. We have some quick and easy tips for finding cool stuff to eat, drink, and do in a new place. They’ve worked for us, and we hope they work for you too.


Technology is your friend. Use it.



In the past, we’ve suggested that you put away your smart phone and Google Maps and opt for the navigational tools of generations past — paper maps. However, just to make things interesting, we’re now suggesting that you put aside your paper maps and use all of the tech you have to your advantage. Keep tabs on a few info sites that you really like…restaurant blogs, bar guides, or urban entertainment sites. These can help cut time out of randomly reading through a bunch of junk before you get to info that’s actually helpful.

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